Hispanic Chamber of E-Commerce Hosting Free Webinar Tomorrow

Courtesy of Hispanic Chamber of E-Commerce:

WEBINAR: Pandemic’s Box: Now that we’re working remote(ly), where do we go from here?

TUESDAY, APRIL 21 AT 11:00 A.M. PST.

Where are we now? Needs in the Current State

– Communication
– Structure and Process
– Compassion

Where Do We Go From Here? Most Discussed Changes in the Future State

– Flexible Future
– Work/Life Balance
– Travel and Real Estate
– HR Practices
– Employee Expectations
– Sustainability
– Specific recommendations to prepare for work after COVID19

PRESENTER: JILL CHAPMAN

Jill Silman Chapman is a Senior Performance Consultant with Insperity Traditional Employment Solutions. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism from The University of Texas at Austin, a Master’s degree in HR Management from Tarleton State University, SPHR and SHRM-SCP certifications, and has 25+ years’ experience in the HR and recruiting industry.

Ms. Chapman partners with clients in order to recruit and train staff with an emphasis on productivity and performance. Through presentations, webinars and podcasts, she helps businesses find the best talent with the latest in recruitment strategy, talent attraction methods and technology. Ms. Chapman has been quoted as a business expert in such media outlets as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and CBS MarketWatch, and has worked with such clients as Marriott, Fox Sports, Monster.com and HR.com.

LINK: https://zoom.us/j/96782846695

FREMONT, CALIF – Office Space Available for Immediate Lease at Drivers for Survivors, Inc.

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Courtesy of Executive Director Sherry Higgs:

 

Dear Drivers For Survivors Supporters,

As we continue to run efficiently and begin steps to make adjustments to our organization as a result of not having received the federal 5310 Grant, we are looking to sublease office space in our Fremont office with immediate availability.

Located less than one mile from the heart of Fremont’s Centerville District, we have two separate offices available for sublease. One unit features 333 square feet of workspace, while the other features 409 square feet of working space.

Both units can be combined via single connecting door, or left separate. Each unit has a private entrance. Ideal use for [the] space is tax preparation, legal work, or insurance agencies. Each unit is equipped with a reception area leading into an office. Tenants have access to [the] first floor conference room for no charge.

If you are interested in inquiring more, please contact us at info@driversforsurvivors.org or sherry@driversforsurvivors.org.

 

Drivers For Survivors

39270 Paseo Padre Pkwy #355

Fremont, CA 94538

 

An Intriguing Look at Corona Virus

Dear West Coast Readers:

Here is a funny, in an ironic-sort-of-way, look at the Corona virus a graphic designer colleague of mine created.

I Had The Coronavirus

It would be great if governors would encourage their constituents to practice normal hygenic protocol, rather than urge them to panic. The spreading of germs can be catastrophic, but unfortunately a recession is starting. There is a happy medium that can be practiced in place of this full-fledged panic.

What about all of the people who die of the flu otherwise? What about all of the people who continue to sneeze into the air and not cover their mouths with their shoulders? Do they care? What about all of the people who take public transit to and from work? I am always cautious of germs (hand sanitizer, part of one!), but I think a national dialogue should occur to find the balance between panic and better health practices.

When Calif. Governor Newsom encouraged seniors to remain home-bound, an image conjured up in my mind of my grandfather. He’s almost 90-years-old. Is he a concert goer? No. He once was – I recall a story of when grandpa took my mom to a Led Zeppelin concert in the late 70s – but he is definitely not now. He’s very healthy, but he is staying home bound since he is elderly. This makes sense that he’s being cautious.

Oregon Goveror Kate Brown and Washington Governor Insee have similar thoughts on reducing crowds to under 250 people. This is great in theory to reduce the spread, but how does a crowd of 50 help? And a few people do have to go to work. For example, when people drive through a fast food restaurant (since many restaurants are closed to patrons for in-house dining), a contagious person still has contact with the emplyee at the drive-thru window.

While it is understandable for many governors to want to limit social gatherings and therefore have concert venues, and convention center events canceled, it may be more economically viable for these leaders to think about the economic repurcussions.

It is discouraging that our healthcare professionals are denying access to their offices. What if a kid is sick with a stomach ache or broke his leg? I completely understand that health care professionals are under duress and have a limited number of kits in which to test people for the virus, and they are our wonderful hygenic heros, but what able the general population who need check ups? Or physical therapy? Or knee surgery?

What is great about this pandemic is that is should and is enouraging all of us to seek ways in which to think differently. I urge you all to contact our city and state governments with thoughtful approaches.

https://govapps.gov.ca.gov/gov40mail/

https://www.oregon.gov/gov/pages/contact.aspx

https://www.governor.wa.gov/contact/contact/contacting-governors-office

DRIVERS FOR SURVIVORS RECEIVES GRANT FROM SHARE THE SPIRIT

PRESS RELEASE COURTESY OF SHERRY HIGGS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NON-PROFIT ‘DRIVERS FOR SURVIV0RS’ IN FREMONT, CALIF.

Fremont, Calif – Drivers For Survivors is pleased to announce it has received a $2,000 grant from Share the Spirit East Bay, a program of the Bay Area News Group – East Bay Times, administered by the Contra Costa Crisis Center. These funds will support the Drivers For Survivors volunteer companion driver program.

Drivers For Survivors (DFS) provides a volunteer driver program that addresses a door-through-door service for ambulatory clients who are diagnosed, or have suspicious findings, with cancer. We provide
not only transportation, but also the companionship element that presents essential support, stress relief and therapeutic presence to allow cancer patients to focus on their health and required treatments.

The funds will be used for Drivers For Survivors’ 7th Annual Volunteer Training and Appreciation Luncheon on February 7, 2020, [at] Massimo’s [Italian restaurant in] Fremont. Our volunteers are the most important element in providing service for cancer patients in need.

Share the Spirit awards annual grants through a competitive application and review process, and each year several awardees are featured in stories in the East Bay Times.

First Book Portland to Host Annual Fundraiser ‘Breweries for Books’

Come to Migration Brewery on July 17th in Portland. Entry is free!  From 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. they’ll be games for the kiddies, beer for the adults; trivia from ShanRock’s Triviology to play…

And you can purchase the children’s books of the local authors who will be inside, creating crafts with kids; You can also enter a raffle and win a prize!

50 percent of trivia proceeds from the evening will go to First Book Portland, and 10 perfect from Migration Brewing will be donated to boot. So come on buy, and get some awesome loot!

First Book Portland is an amazing non-profit and each year it hosts its annual fundraiser called Breweries for Books at Migration Brewing. Its mission is to distrubute free and low-cost books to children.

According to their press release, local children’s authors Brian W. Parker and Josie A. Parker will be leading craft activities for children. And signed copies of their books will be available to purchase on site as well.

 

Drivers for Survivors Hosting its Sixth Annual Black and White Ball Next Month

FREMONT, CALIF – Drivers for Survivors is a non-profit which depends on volunteers to take cancer patients to their doctors appointments.

Starting six years ago,  this organization began hosting an annual Black and White Ball to raise money to celebrate its success, join with sponsors and cheer on volunteers and meet donors. It will be held on Saturday, April 6, 2019 in Pleasanton, Calif., which is in Alameda County.

Drivers for Survivors also connects cancer patients with oncologosts and volunteers. Please fill out the form on their website if you or anyone you know would like to volunteer or can connect a patient with a doctor.

For more information on the mission statement, please visit http://driversforsurvivors.org/about-us/our-mission/.

Alameda County Non-Profit Drivers for Survivors to hold Annual Gala on Saturday, April 7 2018

Originally published on parmigianipapers.com

-By Emily Anderson

FREMONT, CALIF.  – Drivers for Survivors, a 501 c (3) non-profit located in Fremont, Calif., is holding its Fourth Annual Black and White Ball next month on Saturday, April 7th at Castlewood Country Club in Pleasanton, Calif.

Like a toddler graduating from crawling to walking, Drivers for Survivors has pleasantly and professionally grown into a wonderful five-year-old non-profit which provides much needed support to cancer patients who need rides to their medical appointments who may not otherwise have a ride.

The phrase volunteer companionship is often used on the Drivers for Survivors website and in its communications with donors and the community. What Executive Director Sherry Higgs dubs as “volunteer companionship” is very important to the mission. Volunteers who drive cancer patients to their medical appointments do indeed offer social companionship.

If you’re philanthropic-minded, you can drive yourself to the Castlewood CountryClub in Pleasanton, Calif. It’s about 14 miles away from the Drivers for Survivors office. The gala will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. and any one is invited to attend. Tickets are available for purchase at this link: http://driversforsurvivors.org/2018gala/. Tickets are $100 per person or $800 per table.

According to the Drivers for Survivors press release:

“Newark Saxophone Quartet will provide the evening’s cocktail hour music, and performance from  Julie Bannerton will mark the evening of our 5-year service milestone. Drivers For Survivors will be honoring Toni E. Fogarty, Ph.D., MPH as a major contributor towards the organization’s success.

“Come join us for a festive evening of cocktails, dinner, and dancing. Your presence and support will send a powerful message towards our mission. Sponsors: Premier Nissan and Premier Subaru of Fremont, Renshaw Foundation, Davita, Inc., Kaiser Permanente, Whole Foods Market, The  Bernardin Family McDonald’s of Fremont, Dale Hardware, Dutra Enterprises, Fremont Elks Lodge #2121, Mean Well USA, Inc., Republic Services, S5 Advisory, Sisters of the Holy Family, and Horizon Financial Associates.”

Ms. Toni Fogarty is the guest of honor and she is a professor and works at Calif. State University, East Bay in the department of affairs and public administration. She is the graduate coordinator for the Master of Science Health Care Administration program offered at C.S.U. East Bay. Intrigued why she will be the honoree of the evening on April 7, she gives some insight:

“I’ve been working with Sherry and Drivers for Survivors from almost the start (of its founding) when a MS-HCA alumnus introduced me to Sherry. Sherry and I have worked closely since then to provide MS-HCA students with internship opportunities at D.F.S, which has been a ‘win’ / ‘win’ situation for D.F.S., the MS-HCA program and the community.

“Having competent interns greatly contributed to Driver’s For Survivor’s Growth and its ability to better serve the community. The students placed at D.F.S. had substantial learning opportunities in a variety of different operational areas and all of them reported that the experience at DFS was beneficial to their professional development. Of course, the overwhelming majority of Drivers for Survivors’ success can be attributed directly to Sherry’s work and the work of the volunteer drivers.

“The M.S.-H.CA. (program staff, students and I) are just glad that we could contribute to a part of that success. DFS is a valuable community resource, and I hope that we can continue our internship partnership.”

For those of you living in the Alameda County area, get ready. Mark your calendars. And drive out to dine in at the Castlewood Country Club while supporting a great cause.

A Few Oregon Restaurants To Donate a Portion of Veteran’s Day Sales to Returning Veterans Project

–By Emily Anderson

Tomorrow is Veteran’s Day, and while Oregonians will be celebrating in many ways, there are a handful of Oregon restaurants that are participating in what is known as Chow Down for Vets, a community event created by a Portland, Ore.-based non-profit called Returning Veterans Project. If anyone eats at the participating restaurants tomorrow, each restaurant will donate a portion of their days’ sales to Returning Veterans Project.


Pastini Pastaria, a popular Oregon Italian-themed restaurant chain, will be donating a portion of each sale to the Returing Veterans Project, according to their blog. Pastini Pastaria will “also be offering a free entree to every current service member and veteran on Veteran’s Day along with a big ‘thank you!’ from all of us at Pastini.” According to their website, in order to receive a free entree, any veteran or current service member will simply have to let his or her server know. Other participating eateries are On Deck Sports Bar and Grill (located in downtown Portland), 12 Bridge Ciderworks in Oregon City, and The Pit Stop Sports Bar andd BBQ Grill in Beaverton.


The mission of Returning Veterans Project is to provide free health services for veterans who have served in the military after Sept. 11, 2001 and their families who live in Oregon and Southwest Washington state. According to their website, “Returning Veterans Project fulfills its mission by recruiting, training and supporting a volunteer healthcare network of more than 335 licensed independent mental health and somatic practitioners, healthcare clinic providers and equine therapy projects. To become an R.V.P. provider, each practitioner must be licensed in good standing, complete our application / orientation process and agree to deliver only pro bono mental health and somatic services (massage, acupuncture, chiropractic and naturopathic care and more) to post-9/11 war zone veterans, service members and their families throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.”


Mike McCarrel is the director of operations at Returning Veterans Project. When asked about what he enjoys most about working here, he says that “R.V.P. [provides] the opportunity to connect the military community to the civilian community. Our whole model is based on asking volunteer professionals, the majority of which are not veterans, to volunteer a slot of their [health] practice to a post 9/11 veteran or a family member. This creates a space not only to provide needed services to veterans and their families, it also creates an avenue for people from very different backgrounds to connect and support each other in their local communities.”

He’s not sure yet if he can make it to Pastini Pastaria, but he will try. He also may grab a beer from On Deck Sports Bar and Grill, a new partner that joined forces with his organization last year. Jeff, of 12Bridge Ciderworks & Taproom, will donate 15 percent of all cider sales to the Returning Veterans Project. Jeff served as a Marine Corps reservist for six years.


“I have a special place in my heart for those who serve in combat” he said. “They need all the help we can provide.”


Veteran’s Day became a legal holiday declared by the U.S. government on May 13, 1938, but the idea behind honoring war heroes started on November 11, 1918. The World War 1 armistice (temporary halting of fighting) was on November 11, 1918 and lasted about seven months before the war officially ended. In November of 1919, President Woodrow Wilson declared Armistice Day as a day to celebrate and honor those who served in the war. Throughout time, Veteran’s Day (when it became a legal holiday) became a way of the U.S. government and fellow Americans to recognize those who served in both world wars and then, as of June 1954, the government voted to change the phrase from Armistice Day to Veteran’s Day as a way to honor those who served in the Korean war. Since then, Veteran’s Day is a way to honor all of those who served in any U.S. war.


So come down, chow down and know that by simply eating a meal, you are helping a worthy non-profit provide free health care services to worthy veterans.

 

Drivers for Survivors Announces Expansion of its Volunteer Service Area in Alameda County, Calif.

–By Emily R. Anderson

Drivers for Survivors is a non-profit organization located in Fremont, Calif. which pairs volunteer drivers with cancer patients who need rides to their medical appointments.

The mission is simply wonderful. In order for cancer patients to worry less about how to get to their appointments, Drivers for Survivors provides much needed support for those who already have enough on their emotional plates.

Executive Director Sherry Higgs started this non-profit and shared her enthusiasm with how her volunteers throughout the past five years have been life savers. More often than not, volunteer drivers – who have gone through back ground checks, have had a good driving record for at least five years, and have a reliable, working car – become friends with their clients.

Drivers for Survivors has been around for almost five years serving clients living in Fremont, Union City and Newark. As of July 1st, volunteers have since begun serving clients living in more Alameda County cities: Hayward, San Lorenzo, San Leandro, Castro Valley, Ashland and Cherryland. It is located at 39270 Paseo Padre Parkway, Suite 355.

Dubbed volunteer companion drivers by Higgs, these angels on wheels can decide how often they want to volunteer. Some people only have time to drive clients on weekends or once a week; the need is always there, but it’s a stress-free scheduling environment because there is no schedule. There are no time slots that need to be filled in advance.

Ms. Higgs says that “volunteers will get an e-mail every day or a call when a (a pick up) needs to be fulfilled. No private information is given. For example an e-mail will list that the client is a Fremont resident, and his or her Fremont appointment starts at 9:30 a.m. and ends at 3:25 p.m at the Fremont Kaiser location. The volunteers reply back and [decide to take] number one or number five on the list. Sometimes volunteers choose a few appointments at once. Sometimes drivers bond really well with their passengers and decide to keep [giving] their passengers rides.”

Photo Courtesy of Driver’s For Survivors

Once a volunteer chooses to accept a ride, a patient then decides which information to give to Drivers for Survivors volunteers.

Volunteer drivers do need to give at least one client ride once every six months in order to remain in “active” status. Drivers for Survivors currently has 121 active volunteer drivers and has had 214 drivers overall since it began. She has had four volunteers who have volunteered since the beginning; in fact, the woman who gave Ms. Higgs rides to her appointments when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 is one of these four women.

Drivers for Survivors has received several awards over the years from California politicians and Ms. Higgs has been inducted into the Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame. (This organization recognizes women who are leaders who live in or work in Alameda County.)

Ms. Higgs has been very grateful for the serendipitous moments that have occurred over the years, thankful for every one’s efforts to continue helping in the organization’s growth.

“We all need to grab onto something: a non-profit, or any cause…and give more of ourselves,” she said. “The medical providers and our mainstream resources have so much on their plates already. Networks like ours are very valuable because we pick up some of the slack.”

Drivers for Survivors is expanding its 403-square-feet office into the office space next door to create 333 more square feet for staff and interns by August 1. While 736 square-feet isn’t huge, this much-needed space will continue to allow all staff, interns and volunteers to continue their dedicated work. Since the beginning, 11,500 rides have been given to 288 cancer patients.  And Ms. Higgs hopes to create satellite offices in other areas in the future to accommodate other volunteers and clients in the future.

Interns and non-driving volunteers are always needed for marketing, administrative support, and the need for putting up flyers in the community is always helpful. Drivers for Survivors also holds its annual gala at the Castlewood County Club, so fundraising efforts are key.

Drivers for Survivors also holds annual volunteer appreciation luncheons as well as quarterly volunteer trainings so volunteers can meet each other and discuss any relevant topics as needed. For example, volunteers may need to be trained how to help a blind cancer patient in and out of vehicles.

The logo on the brochures shows a red heart atop wheels. Ms. Higgs expressed the importance of “the synergy of working together” because Drivers for Survivors is doing the right thing.

“It’s important to keep the momentum going,” Higgs said. She speaks with such pride and love of the non-profit. She started as a one woman show and she understands the value of volunteers’ time and efforts. Her energy and passion for the simple, but life-saving mission is heartfelt: love for the organization’s mission is what keeps her driving onward.

If you’re in the Alameda County area and would like to volunteer, please call 510-579-0535 or e-mail info@driversforsurvivors.org.